Impromptu Visit: TYPE ONE

Impromptu Visit: TYPE ONE

I was reluctant to visit TYPE ONE on day three of my short visit to Japan. Not because I didn’t want to, but because my ankles were swollen from all the walking in the last 48 hours. Every step was a ripple of excruciating pain. To the point that at certain moments I became slightly teary eyed throughout the rest of my Japan journey. I know what you’re thinking, but trust me it was a pain that I wouldn’t wish upon my greatest adversary (which there is none). Likewise, i had been told that normally there isn’t much to see at the shop unless someone there is anticipating your visit. But of course, I was in Japan for one sole purpose – to photograph the legendary tuning culture and the community behind it. Regardless of what or wasn’t present at TYPE ONE, it was a venture i was willing to take. Even while being temporarily handicap. Therefore, I applied an ungodly number of hot/cold patches that I had randomly acquired in Yokohama, and with my Suica card in-hand, headed west of central Tokyo.

Type One, Suginami

After a ‘short’ 20-minute walk from Ogikubo Station I was in the front of the famed TYPE ONE building. At this point I was excited at the mere thought of all the legends I would witness in the upstairs showroom. Unfortunately for all of us, on this particular day there really wasn’t much to see. Understandable as this is a full-service shop in a country where real estate space is at an all time premium, so vehicles are rotated between customer cars all the time. In hindsight though, I still got to visit a place that many throughout the world can only dream of. Therefore, my time was not wasted. However, I do have one regret, forgetting to leave my mark on their wall that is dedicated to visitors. Damn! So, on my top list of priorities for the next time I visit Japan is to sign the wall, and hopefully there will be more to see on my second visit.


 Standing on the top side stairs of TYPE ONE to shoot the Spoon S660. I’ve always dabbled with other forms of photography on my own time, so it was cool to snap something a little more artistic and architectural.
Standing on the top side stairs of TYPE ONE to shoot the Spoon S660. I’ve always dabbled with other forms of photography on my own time, so it was cool to snap something a little more artistic and architectural.
 A play on shadows and light with a pair of Spoon Sports SW388 forged wheels by the entrance. Gorgeous.
A play on shadows and light with a pair of Spoon Sports SW388 forged wheels by the entrance. Gorgeous.
 Wall display of various valve covers, cams, headers, rotors, individual throttle bodied NSX motor, etc.
Wall display of various valve covers, cams, headers, rotors, individual throttle bodied NSX motor, etc.
 What i believe to be the symbol of Spoon’s heritage and Ichishima-san’s ethos in mechanical form, the third generation Honda Civic E-AT. The original Civic that raced in the Japanese Touring Car Championship series. What a storied sight to witness. Maybe next time it will be on the floor so i can take a closer look. Even better, I’ll know enough Japanese to ask one of the mechanics for a closer look-see, haha.
What i believe to be the symbol of Spoon’s heritage and Ichishima-san’s ethos in mechanical form, the third generation Honda Civic E-AT. The original Civic that raced in the Japanese Touring Car Championship series. What a storied sight to witness. Maybe next time it will be on the floor so i can take a closer look. Even better, I’ll know enough Japanese to ask one of the mechanics for a closer look-see, haha.
 Bumpers on display.
Bumpers on display.
 I’ll be honest and say i know absolutely nothing about motorcycles other than the fact that i want one. If you’re inclined to share some knowledge though, feel free to drop me a beat. I’m all ears.
I’ll be honest and say i know absolutely nothing about motorcycles other than the fact that i want one. If you’re inclined to share some knowledge though, feel free to drop me a beat. I’m all ears.
 The classic Mugen Power CF-48 in Chrome Cut Silver minus the aero disc and wrapped with 185/60 Yokohama Advan Neova’s in 14 inch. This was on a customer’s first generation CRX that wasn’t in the most presentable state, so i regrettably didn’t take a photograph of the entire car. However…
The classic Mugen Power CF-48 in Chrome Cut Silver minus the aero disc and wrapped with 185/60 Yokohama Advan Neova’s in 14 inch. This was on a customer’s first generation CRX that wasn’t in the most presentable state, so i regrettably didn’t take a photograph of the entire car. However…
 the interior was the cleanest i have ever seen for a late 80’s Honda, period.
the interior was the cleanest i have ever seen for a late 80’s Honda, period.
 The famed wall that i begrudgingly forgot to sign. Like i said earlier though, I’ll be back.
The famed wall that i begrudgingly forgot to sign. Like i said earlier though, I’ll be back.
 I headed back downstairs to see the first floor garage and engine building room. I was pretty much unprepared for this trip and forgot some photographic accessories, so i tried to shoot through this window as best as i could. Other than the whole experience though, i really enjoyed the message on the engineers coverall, “RACING TEAM SPOON SPORTS. Teamwork is the keyword. Challenge every possibility. Full of confidence in ourselves. Here is our strong and great team. Pouring its all energies into driving.” Pretty cool.
I headed back downstairs to see the first floor garage and engine building room. I was pretty much unprepared for this trip and forgot some photographic accessories, so i tried to shoot through this window as best as i could. Other than the whole experience though, i really enjoyed the message on the engineers coverall, “RACING TEAM SPOON SPORTS. Teamwork is the keyword. Challenge every possibility. Full of confidence in ourselves. Here is our strong and great team. Pouring its all energies into driving.” Pretty cool.
 Another angle. Once again.. i tried my best…
Another angle. Once again.. i tried my best…
 More customer vehicles waiting to be balanced and tuned to Spoon’s expectations.
More customer vehicles waiting to be balanced and tuned to Spoon’s expectations.

 Random sweet potatoes street vendor in Shinjuku to end this small coverage.
Random sweet potatoes street vendor in Shinjuku to end this small coverage.

That was my short and still enjoyable visit to Spoon Sport’s TYPE ONE in Suginami City. Though not as extensive as i wanted it to be, I’ll be back for another visit eventually. Hopefully next time there will be a little bit more to see. A little advice to those visiting or planning on visiting TYPE ONE, call first. Everyone is very nice and it may save you a trip if you wanted to see something in particular. That goes for most shops around Tokyo and most likely all over Japan. There was a few i stopped by that were completely closed and locked up, so it doesn’t hurt to call ahead of time. If you’re basic Japanese is lacking or you’re a bit shy, then just do what i would of done… call and if someone picks up then immediately hang-up and dash to the locale. LOL. Thanks for visiting the site. As always, until next time.. Peace!